Skip to main content
Topic: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia (Read 1366 times) previous topic - next topic
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

As many others were, I was deeply moved by Eddie's words on Fox Footy last night, I was brought to tears in fact. He ask for our help, so lets help.
I want to do something about It and I am sure many on here would like to help also. It seems the worst environments for this abhorrent behaviour is online, guess what? We are online. There are many very intelligent people on this site, we cannot stand by and ignore Eddie and his people. What can we do? I sent Eddie a DM via instagram this morning telling him I want to help. I gave him my contact details and in the mean time, I pledged to him and all Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people that I would call out racism in any environment I find myself in and will report it.
Nuffs enuff people, we cannot stand by and do nothing.
Any ideas?
2017 - 16th
2018 - Wooden Spoon
2019 - 16th
2020 - dare to dream? 11th is better than last I suppose
2021 - Pi$$ or get off the pot

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #1
We need to stop all forms of bigotry both positive and negative and practise true equality.

Else we simply create the next batch of racists and bigots because we give them a reason to exist.

Stop referring to yourself as black fella.  Stop referring to others as white fella.  Stop referring to your groups as Asians, Indians, africans, wogs (growing up badge of honour), wasps.

Start identifying people instead.  This isn't as bad as everyone makes out.   You can make a racist comment and not be racist and likewise let's stop hanging people for their comments.

Society doesn't function by making everyone walk on eggshells in case they hurt someone's feelings.  It functions by people doing what they do and when someone steps out of line (rightly or wrongly) they acknowledge their stuff up, figure out what's wrong about it, and then apologise for it.

We can't undo what has been done but we can be better to learn from it rather than continually shame ourselves for it.

I can honestly state that I have been made to feel shame for my heritage by some of the kids I grew up with and around.  Two things occurred as a consequence.   I dont truly feel accepted by Australia and therefore embrace my Greek heritage more.  I have actually felt as though I will never really fit in because when I practise greek culture I've heard comments that have made me wonder why my parents came here to begin with. 

Generally I'm a misfit.  I am neither here nor there when it comes to culture and irrespective of what people say I dont really belong.
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #2
Too late to tell indigenous Australians not to call themselves Black fellas. The racists already know who they are and they make sure they’re treated differently. Trying to say their desire to show and feel solidarity is to blame is misguided at best. Let’s stop being racist towards minorities rather than telling them to be the best honorary whites they can be.

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #3
Too late to tell indigenous Australians not to call themselves Black fellas.
You'll even find a distinction is made in Indigenous culture between those who identify as "full blood" and those they see as "half-cast", someone like Betts or Goodes might not even be accepted by some of his distant genetic relatives, it's truly bizarre when you first encounter the idea coming from one Indigenous person that someone like Betts or Goodes isn't a "Real Black Fella"!

Most of the finger-pointing is really a gross generalisation, and that really does more harm than good.

Racism is therefore to some degree endemic, it's not restricted to any group, and as far as I can tell in my sphere of contacts it has no specific relationship with wealth, opportunity, ethnicity or education to determine who, when or where someone may be racist or act with racist intent.
The Force Awakens!

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #4
Too late to tell indigenous Australians not to call themselves Black fellas. The racists already know who they are and they make sure they’re treated differently. Trying to say their desire to show and feel solidarity is to blame is misguided at best. Let’s stop being racist towards minorities rather than telling them to be the best honorary whites they can be.
thats all you absorbed from my post?

No wonder we get nowhere on this subject.
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #5
In other words, LP, we need to put a stop to racism whenever or wherever it arises, no matter who is perpetrating it.

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #6
thats all you absorbed from my post?

No wonder we get nowhere on this subject.
Given GTC’s post was about racism towards indigenous Australians, I limited my response to that topic. If you can state your opinion on that topic concisely, please do it.

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #7
Given GTC’s post was about racism towards indigenous Australians, I limited my response to that topic. If you can state your opinion on that topic concisely, please do it.
I think Thry was pointing out that racism isn't just black and white in Oz its a systemic cultural issue that has affected not just first nations folk and we need an over all solution that protects everyone.
Don't devalue his opinion as he has been at the pointy end himself and we need to include all races, colours, cultures if we want to get it right IMHO.

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #8
Given GTC’s post was about racism towards indigenous Australians, I limited my response to that topic. If you can state your opinion on that topic concisely, please do it.
I'll sum up Thry's point.

Don't highlight your differences, because then others will do the same....not always in a positive fashion.


Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #9
I'll sum up Thry's point.

Don't highlight your differences, because then others will do the same....not always in a positive fashion.
So then does that mean an act of racism fundamentally an act of hypocrisy?
The Force Awakens!

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #10
If I were a PR guru and racists came to me for some advice, I’d proceed as follows.

Take a leaf from Union busters. If you can stop people from organising and seeking public support, you can fragment them and exert power over them individually. Start a campaign to accuse the minority du jour of being the true racists: they should instead be admonished that they should forego any communal identity and blend. The catchcry should be, “I don’t see any colour - white, black, green ... it’s all the same to me. If you highlight your own skin colour or someone else’s, then you’re the real racist!”

This approach will work brilliantly. You’ll be free to carry on attacking indigenous Australians but you can add righteous indignation that they’re being racist in protesting about Invasion Day and the like. And you can use it as a cudgel to beat back anyone who may sympathise with the group you’re attacking.

Brilliant, eh? You can simply declare that racism doesn’t exist and some people will believe you. That’ll be $20,000, gentlemen, payable in Bitcoin.

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #11
In the USA they use a term "Passing", most of the time it's used and assumed to identify people who are accused of betraying/denying their African American heritage to "pass as white", in the bad old days it was apparently very common for mixed race individuals to pass themselves off as Italian, European or Welsh to get access to restricted resources and communities, even to marry.

But the term "passing" is not unidirectional, it's also used to describe someone who identifies themselves or connects with a culture when they really aren't part of it. Here you might think of Mitch Robinson or perhaps a Doug Pascoe aligning themselves with Indigenous culture, in that context the term passing works in the other direction.

In more modern time, the term is also starting to appear in social discussion of gender and sexuality.

In all cases it is derogative and divisive, yet it's still widely used and popular in racism debates, and in recent academic circles it's use has experienced a renaissance.
The Force Awakens!

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #12
It's not possible to understand racism without understanding power relations, race relations and history. Racism manifests itself in different ways, on a spectrum from casual to overt, from simply being mildly odd and irritating to doing lasting and significant damage. It's a genuine problem which must be attended to collectively and individually.

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #13
It's not possible to understand racism without understanding power relations, race relations and history. Racism manifests itself in different ways, on a spectrum from casual to overt, from simply being mildly odd and irritating to doing lasting and significant damage. It's a genuine problem which must be attended to collectively and individually.
I fear the term has become too general, and now encapsulates far too many antisocial behaviours for it to ever be resolved.

For me true racism is more about xenophobia, but now it's broadened to become a political, social and economic weapon.
The Force Awakens!

Re: Eddie's Fight Against Racism in Australia

Reply #14
I fear the term has become too general, and now encapsulates far too many antisocial behaviours for it to ever be resolved.

For me true racism is more about xenophobia, but now it's broadened to become a political, social and economic weapon.

I disagree. Racism can and is way more subtle than overt xenophobia IMO.