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Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7230
Two days later, 3 Leos... 28th.  :)

How about we have joint birthday party, 3 Leos, a huge party, on the 27th at the end of this year! Who knows, the club might loan us the 2023 Premiership Cup for the event  :D
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7231
How about we have joint birthday party, 3 Leos, a huge party, on the 27th at the end of this year! Who knows, the club might loan us the 2023 Premiership Cup for the event  :D
Not a terrible idea at all.  Maybe the club will allow us a venue that wont cancel either!! 
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson


Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7233
Another study supports the theory that Covid started with animals (raccoon dogs) in a wet market: The Strongest Evidence Yet That an Animal Started the Pandemic, The Atlantic.
I think it's self-evident that the pandemic was a zoonosis of sorts.

The Lab theory is political bullsh1t, some using it as an excuse to be racist, others using it as an excuse to justify doing nothing!

I'm cautious about many of these bat, rat, cat, racoon type reports. Not because it's impossible, in fact it may even be highly likely, but because a lot come out of or are funded by groups rallying against the live animal trade. While I'm not opposed to protesting against those cruelties, I'm not prepared to bastardise the science to make political ground. I'm also well aware that any little success they have on that front will next be directed at our own farmers. That doesn't mean that I'm calling for no action, it just means I retain a healthy scepticism.
The Force Awakens!

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7234
Some good news: it looks like Long-Covid was a much smaller issue than it appeared to be early on:
Long COVID Comes Into the Light, Slate.


Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7235
Finally, we have closure on that horse drug ‘COVID cure’, ivermectin. Well, sort of, The Age.

2 big and well-conducted studies have put the final nails in the Ivermectin coffin. But like vampires, the Ivermectin crowd can’t be killed off simply by science. They’re now hawking Ivermectin as a flu treatment  :o

Pity Flyboy isn’t around to argue that some study of 5 patients in Uganda shows it works really well.

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7236
So much money wasted because of political and social constructs, proving and re-proving things that were already self-evident, debunking subjectivity and myth. You get to the end of this costly process, and the nutters still won't believe, because their beliefs are based in fantasy and conspiracy. No matter what evidence gets provided they will just "invent a fresh fantasy" to negate it!

While I'm happy to see yet another validation of the real science, I'm not happy that people keep putting their hand up for grants to study this over and over again. It in effect steals money from the sort of research that really needs to be done.

Is this waste the true cost of deregulated social media?
The Force Awakens!

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7237
The ivermectin boosters weren't worth listening to because they had a foot in two camps and couldn't figure out if COVID was a legitimate threat, and whether or not medication was required, but if it was required, then Ivermectin would solve it and not the vaccine, which is completely hypocritical and sounds more like "I'll do anything but take a vaccine".

A very stupid way to address the pandemic with concerns that are somewhat valid to begin with and make genuine critics sound crazy by association which is the only reason they got attention to start with because it helps make people sheep.  After the whole vaccination stand that was taken, there was no way to say "oops, we got that and a few other things wrong", so the same line will be towed until someone is brave enough to come forward and tell us with certainty about the true lessons learned.

For mine, COVID is nothing too concerning and managed easily enough by Panadol or Paracetemol.  I wouldn't be indulging in fanciful fixes like Ivermectin even if they worked.

Whether or not the vaccine works as advertised is another story.  It may be a prophylactic for getting COVID as far as we can tell or it might do nothing but provide people some confidence.  Using my own case study, despite living normally I dodged COVID until 12 months after my 3rd vaccination which lends weight to it offering some level of protection, but a problem there is knowing whether or not I got near a positive case.  I have no way to know this with any confidence because I associated with too few people even though I was out in public to know if someone actually caught COVID around me and was a close contact extremely infrequently.  If you are worried about it, or compromised, get vaccinated, but there is no need to force the masses who are like me to get vaccinated. 

So draw your own conclusion from the above.  I'm going to let my immune system fight it with assistance from Panadol rather than go the vaccine route from now on, because that suits me fine and even at my worst covid symptoms, I didnt really need medical assistance, just some good old fashioned bed rest and couch time to recover with Panadol keeping the fever down.

Not sure why rest, hydration and downtime aren't the immediate go to fixes for illness these days.  Perhaps it has something to do with the bulk billing model where doctors only get paid on a visit, and that means bring your patients back daily to give them a certificate rather than giving them a chunk of time off to rest.  Happened to me a few years back.  Copped Gastro on Saturday, hadn't held food down and went to the GP on monday.  Gave me a certificate for one day.  Went back the next day still not having eaten food and got another one day cert when all I could do was keep my fluids up.  The next day went to another GP, who upon hearing that I hadnt eaten for almost 5 days and was still not keeping any food down, gave me the rest of the week off, told me to keep hydrated and rest.  Why do I need 3 visits to a GP to get 5 days off work when I was incapable of digesting food properly and was effectively peeing out of my A-Hole? 

The answer is that some doctors were too busy maximising their medicare returns.  A poor practise, and if you live in the Northern Suburbs, I know he practises out of two medical clinics, and one of them is close to Campbellfield, and the other is near Greensborough and Ill give you his name if you PM me.  More just to keep him honest if you visit him.  I have since stopped seeing him and have switched to a non bulk billing medical centre, because if I am paying for it, at very least the duty of care is not to fleece me.
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7238
The guy next door to my daughter lived with his Mum who has just turned 100.
Amazing woman, eastern European immigrant who lived through the horrors of the war but pretty independent and healthy. She still gets out in the garden.
Her son was in his early seventies
He caught Covid two Sundays ago.
He's dead!.
She hasn't caught it.

It's very selective.
For some it may be no more than a cold.
For others it's the end.
I get my fifth shot next Tuesday.

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7239
Mrs DJC and I are booked in for our 5th COVID vaccination.  The person taking our details asked when we last had COVID and was quite surprised when we said never.

I suppose that we could have been infected and asymptomatic but I think the chances of that are pretty slim.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7240
Mrs DJC and I are booked in for our 5th COVID vaccination.  The person taking our details asked when we last had COVID and was quite surprised when we said never.

I suppose that we could have been infected and asymptomatic but I think the chances of that are pretty slim.

Yours truly also booked in for another booster yesterday. I was also asked about having Covid recently and my response was similar to yours. I asked the Doc what difference it would make if I'd had Covid recently to having another jab... his response was that after infection there is a natural immunity for a short while due to our own immune system, and that a jab would be a waste as a result.
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7241
It’s a mistake to generalise our own experiences to represent everybody else’s experiences. Just because Covid didn’t affect you greatly doesn’t mean it didn’t affect anyone else greatly (especially when the number of deaths was so high). The next pandemic might not be so kind to you while others get off scott free.

This is the big difference between sexual and asexual reproduction. Parthenogenesis ensures that the whole population has the same exposure to disease and can lead to a mass die-off. But sexual reproduction leads to variations in the genes that can help some of the population avoid illness. I linked an article that one such variation helped some people survive the Black Death and the same variation may have helped people avoid Covid. On the other hand, it predisposed those people to diabetes.

It’s also a bit rash to assume away the benefits of vaccination. Maybe the vaccine ensured that Covid didn’t have much affect on you when you caught it.

Finally, dwelling on the possibility that you could have blown off the vaccine and other preventative measures given that Covid ultimately had little impact on you is pointless. How could you know this ahead of time? The early advice was that age and certain co-morbidities increased one’s exposure and this was reflected in the vaccination release dates. But as with insurance, is it a wasted expense just because the risk you’re insuring against didn’t occur? Quite a few years back, there was some research that suggested that cannabis generally didn’t cause schizophrenia but in a small number of cases a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia could be activated by heavy cannabis use. The problem at least at that time was that there wasn’t a test available to determine whether a particular person was at risk. Therefore a heavy cannabis smoker who didn’t suffer from schizophrenia would be able to say there was no connection while a heavy cannabis smoker who developed schizophrenia would be able to say the link was clear.

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7242
The debate will continue to rage simply because there are those who want to profit from misdirection, a good example is the current debate about vaccine harm and death rates.

But those debating the issue always omit a simple but very critical aspect of the global situation, no vaccine, as for that matter nothing at all, that you put into your body goes in without some risk. Whether it's water or a venom, everything has potential to either impact somebody or have no obvious effect at all! This is the simple situation when the scale of the event is large enough.

I think the bigger crime is that those debates divert attention from the real crime, which has been the inaction of authorities to prepare for this inevitable pandemic event, and on economic grounds they are already shutting down efforts to prepare for the next one.
The Force Awakens!

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7243
Finally, dwelling on the possibility that you could have blown off the vaccine and other preventative measures given that Covid ultimately had little impact on you is pointless. How could you know this ahead of time? The early advice was that age and certain co-morbidities increased one’s exposure and this was reflected in the vaccination release dates. But as with insurance, is it a wasted expense just because the risk you’re insuring against didn’t occur? Quite a few years back, there was some research that suggested that cannabis generally didn’t cause schizophrenia but in a small number of cases a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia could be activated by heavy cannabis use. The problem at least at that time was that there wasn’t a test available to determine whether a particular person was at risk. Therefore a heavy cannabis smoker who didn’t suffer from schizophrenia would be able to say there was no connection while a heavy cannabis smoker who developed schizophrenia would be able to say the link was clear.
Humans are horrendous at identifying and assessing risk, which seems to be an evolutionary trait of most numerous species in that there is no need to preserve individuals, so why waste the resource on developing an acute sense of risk?
The Force Awakens!

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #7244
It’s a mistake to generalise our own experiences to represent everybody else’s experiences. Just because Covid didn’t affect you greatly doesn’t mean it didn’t affect anyone else greatly (especially when the number of deaths was so high). The next pandemic might not be so kind to you while others get off scott free.

It’s also a bit rash to assume away the benefits of vaccination. Maybe the vaccine ensured that Covid didn’t have much affect on you when you caught it.

Completely agree, Wingman MAV. Personally, I have very little doubt that the vaccines/boosters I've had have contributed in no small way to me being symptom free for quite some time, and quite possibly asymptomatic when infected. Next booster booked.
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17