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Cyprus

Thry’s comments about the etymology of Gallipoli got me thinking about Cyprus.  I’ve never been there but it’s a place I’d love to visit.

My late brother served with the United Nations Civilian Police on Cyprus in the late 1960s.  His stories of grenade attacks, Roman and Greek ruins, and the cultural links that joined the Greek and Turkish communities were fascinating and played no small part in my career choices.

My brother had a gift for languages and was fluent in Turkish and Cypriot Greek (he also learnt Swedish and was able to give a keynote speech in Swedish after 10 days in the country).  When we attended ANZAC Day marches together, his encouragement of the Greek and Turkish contingents was always reciprocated … and his dark complexion had both contingents claiming him as one of their own.

In more recent times, several of my mates/colleagues have Cypriot heritage and they are very interested in hearing about my brother’s experiences.  One close friend’s husband recently published a wonderful book called Tales of Cyprus.  It details the close relationship between Greek and Turkish Cypriots, a relationship that has been torn apart by 20th century geopolitical machinations.

My friend’s husband’s latest effort is an exploration of Greek Cypriot language.  Many Greek Cypriot words/phrases have Turkish or Arabic origins, as you would expect given Cyprus’s location and the expansion and contraction of the Byzantine and Ottoman empires.  I suspect that the Norman colonisation of the Mediterranean was also a factor.

So, what does this all mean?  Nothing apart from trying to understand the local geopolitical situation.  Attempting to explain events in other parts of the globe at other times through the Cypriot lens doesn’t work.  It is a fascinating example of cultural processes at work.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: Cyprus

Reply #1
My best man's parents are Greek Cypriot, their families were kicked out of their own homes by the Turks in 1974?. No love lost there.


2012 HAPPENED!!!!!!!

Re: Cyprus

Reply #2
^^

This is true on both sides of the fence.  Depending on which side of Cypriot politics you listen to, there are wide and various problems at play in the nation, but ultimately it remains an island nation divided by modern nationalism and external influences.

Did you know that Cyprus has the pound as currency?  Up until the euro, the Greeks used Drachma, and the Turks use their Lira.

The people of Famagusta tell some interesting tales, and there are many different political aspects of this that play out.  Often these issues are tied back to communist, vs capitalist governments, but even so, I am unqualified to comment.  There is a bit of angst at Turkey.  They did (and sometimes politically still do) claim a lot Greek heritage as their own, and then state that the modern Greek state is fictitious.  Its a perspective, one that has its flaws, but could entirely possibly be correct.  None will know the wiser.  Balkan politics is a messy affair made messier by the fact that the area has been ruled by many different cultural influences as far reaching as French and British. 

When it all comes down to it, certain political alliances are the ones that continue to drive it, and its usually linked to resources.  Interestingly, the mediteranean has over the last 20 years been determined to be rich in many natural resources, and now we are seeing new claims on what was previously drawn borders, and new chest thumping occurring again over a treaty that was drawn up post world war 1 which looks to dissapointingly leading to a fresh new conflict.

"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: Cyprus

Reply #3
My friend’s family home/village is under Turkish control.  She is allowed to visit but under very strict conditions.

Her husband interviewed Greek and Turkish Cypriots for his book and they all talk about happier times when ethnicity and religion didn’t determine one’s sense of community and belonging, and one’s rights. Governments and politicians can get things so wrong.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: Cyprus

Reply #4
This thread has me thinking Greek for dinner, lamb or octopus?

Yes, yes I know, I'm going to hell for eating something char grilled and dressed up in a little lemon and dill that was as intelligent as an octopus!
The Force Awakens!

Re: Cyprus

Reply #5
This thread has me thinking Greek for dinner, lamb or octopus?

Yes, yes I know, I'm going to hell for eating something char grilled and dressed up in a little lemon and dill that was as intelligent as an octopus!
octopus is my first go to of those two. Lambs are only killed at Easter time to symbolically break fast after the resurrection of the lamb of God.  Goat is actually more likely from a Greek kitchen.  The land isn't extremely flat and you're more likely to see them raise pigs and goats anyway in mountainous terrains.  Only catch with octopus is if you're preparing it, simmer it really slowly in its own juices before grilling on a hot grill.  Octopus goes to blubber if its not treated appropriately and you need to coax out its juices very very slowly.  There is a reason they hang them on a clothes line everywhere to sun dry them before cooking them.
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: Cyprus

Reply #6
octopus is my first go to of those two. Lambs are only killed at Easter time to symbolically break fast after the resurrection of the lamb of God.  Goat is actually more likely from a Greek kitchen.  The land isn't extremely flat and you're more likely to see them raise pigs and goats anyway in mountainous terrains.  Only catch with octopus is if you're preparing it, simmer it really slowly in its own juices before grilling on a hot grill.  Octopus goes to blubber if its not treated appropriately and you need to coax out its juices very very slowly.  There is a reason they hang them on a clothes line everywhere to sun dry them before cooking them.

That's my limited experience as well. One of my dearest friends is a chef in Canberra... and Greek. He introduced me to goat and octopus prepared and cooked properly. Simply amazing. About 5 years ago he treated us (Easter time) to a lamb on a spit in the backyard, after preparing it for about 24 hours... again, amazing. Such passion and respect for food.
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: Cyprus

Reply #7
Octopus sounds amazing, I'll pass on the lamb though.
Reality always wins in the end.

Re: Cyprus

Reply #8
Octopus sounds amazing, I'll pass on the lamb though.
Same, Wife's step mum is Greek and a lovely kind lady but live fluffy lamb in the backyard to dead meat on the plate left me with no appetite and I couldn't eat Lamb anymore.

Re: Cyprus

Reply #9
Same, Wife's step mum is Greek and a lovely kind lady but live fluffy lamb in the backyard to dead meat on the plate left me with no appetite and I couldn't eat Lamb anymore.

I don't know how I would handle that EB,, a bit confrontational to say the least! I just can't stand the smell or taste of lamb and once got into a blue with a guy on a public bbq when he threw on his lamb cutlets next to my fillet steak, aaaargh!
Reality always wins in the end.

Re: Cyprus

Reply #10
I don't know how I would handle that EB,, a bit confrontational to say the least! I just can't stand the smell or taste of lamb and once got into a blue with a guy on a public bbq when he threw on his lamb cutlets next to my fillet steak, aaaargh!
Cookie, As a kid I used to love Lamb, nothing better than gnawing your way through a lamb chop or finding the left overs of a Sunday roast in your school lunch in a sandwich. However you never think about where the meat comes from when you are a kid and as I got older the thought of chowing down on some baby animal carcass put me off.
Yeah I'm a hypocrite as I still love my Beef, chicken, fish etc but I can't come at Lamb, Veal and Pork where it's baby animals on the menu. I'm not manic about it and in some family/friend meal situations I will eat a small portion to be hospitable but will avoid those meats where I can.
I don't judge others though and people have different customs, value sets, etc .
Get what you mean with the taste though, when you haven't eaten it for a while it does have a sickly gamey taste/smell to it even when cooking...
My preferred meat is a Scotch Fillet well cooked....not raw and still kicking on the plate like you get at fancy eateries...

Re: Cyprus

Reply #11
This thread has me thinking Greek for dinner, lamb or octopus?

Yes, yes I know, I'm going to hell for eating something char grilled and dressed up in a little lemon and dill that was as intelligent as an octopus!

Mmmm, octopus!

I have a calamari dip that I’m going to try this arvo 🙂
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: Cyprus

Reply #12
Yeah I'm a hypocrite as I still love my Beef, chicken, fish etc but I can't come at Lamb, Veal and Pork where it's baby animals on the menu. I'm not manic about it and in some family/friend meal situations I will eat a small portion to be hospitable but will avoid those meats where I can.

The only time I felt uneasy during my brief career as a slaughter man was when the then Premier Dick Hamer sent in a mob of very young calves.  I had to hang down into the crush to reach their heads with the bolt gun.

I rarely eat veal but don’t mind lamb.  When I was a kid, my mum would by “two-tooth” because it was cheaper than lamb.  Tastier too, as the muscle has more time to absorb minerals and compounds from the vegetation.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: Cyprus

Reply #13
Cookie, As a kid I used to love Lamb, nothing better than gnawing your way through a lamb chop or finding the left overs of a Sunday roast in your school lunch in a sandwich. However you never think about where the meat comes from when you are a kid and as I got older the thought of chowing down on some baby animal carcass put me off.
Yeah I'm a hypocrite as I still love my Beef, chicken, fish etc but I can't come at Lamb, Veal and Pork where it's baby animals on the menu. I'm not manic about it and in some family/friend meal situations I will eat a small portion to be hospitable but will avoid those meats where I can.
I don't judge others though and people have different customs, value sets, etc .
Get what you mean with the taste though, when you haven't eaten it for a while it does have a sickly gamey taste/smell to it even when cooking...
My preferred meat is a Scotch Fillet well cooked....not raw and still kicking on the plate like you get at fancy eateries...

As a kid EB I used to enjoy a nice roast leg of lamb served with spring vegetables and a homemade mint sauce but over the years I just turned off it due to that same sickly taste/smell you mentioned.
Reality always wins in the end.

Re: Cyprus

Reply #14
I love a bit of lamb.
When I was single I did a lamb shanks that was a panty dropper, certified 😎👍🏼
My Thai wife can’t stand the smell and taste of lamb though, she’s tried but no good.
I’ve hidden it in spicy Indian curries and she picks it straight away.
She was devastated when we drove through SA at xmas, she saw sheep and thought they looked so cute and wanted to eat one, I had to explain that lambs were baby sheep… 🙄
🤣