Skip to main content
Topic: AI and creativity. (Read 8026 times) previous topic - next topic
0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic.

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #15
ChatGpt had Freddie Mercury, Bruce Springsteen, Prince and Bono as the best male lead singers of a band in that 80's era when I asked the question....Steve Perry didnt get a mention.


Here's what I got when I asked the AI who were the best power ballad singers of the 1980s

Quote
The 1980s was a decade of power ballads, and many male singers made their mark in this genre. Some of the best male power ballad singers of the 1980s include:

Michael Bolton: Michael Bolton is an American singer and songwriter who rose to fame in the 1980s. He is known for his powerful voice and emotional ballads. Some of his most popular power ballads from this decade include “How Am I Supposed to Live Without You” and “When a Man Loves a Woman” 1.

Richard Marx: Richard Marx is an American singer, songwriter, and producer who had several hits in the 1980s. Some of his most popular power ballads from this decade include “Right Here Waiting” and “Hold On to the Nights” 2.

Steve Perry: Steve Perry is an American singer and songwriter who was the lead vocalist of the rock band Journey. He had several hits in the power ballad genre, including “Open Arms” and “Faithfully” 3.

Bon Jovi: Bon Jovi is an American rock band that had several hits in the 1980s, including “Livin’ on a Prayer” and “Wanted Dead or Alive.” The band’s lead singer, Jon Bon Jovi, is known for his powerful vocals and emotional performances 4.

Foreigner: Foreigner is a British-American rock band that had several hits in the 1980s, including “I Want to Know What Love Is” and “Waiting for a Girl Like You.” The band’s lead singer, Lou Gramm, is known for his powerful voice and emotional performances 5.

These are just a few examples of some of the best male power ballad singers from the 1980s. There were many other talented artists who made their mark in this genre during this decade.

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #16
Here's what I got when I asked the AI who were the best power ballad singers of the 1980s

Scary😳
I'll throw in Paul Rodgers of "Free and Bad Company fame" as my No 1.
Queen chose him to work with as well and I thought he was very good at filling in for Freddie when Queen toured for a few years.

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #17
These LLM AIs can be manipulated by starting a counter-argument, you can basically debate with the engine and it will change the response to make you happy with the answer, truth and accuracy mean very little.

Also careful crafting of any question will change the response as the LLM take a very literal interpretation of the question, so much so drafting questions is now a career option for some segments of business!

Ask the same fundamental question worded two different ways, and get different answers.
The Force Awakens!

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #18
As much as people fear AI, I suppose it is natural to fear something you do not understand or cannot observe, when you see what is going on right now surrounding Russia, Ukraine, Israel, Palestine and some TBA, you basically have the likes of Trump, Zuckerberg and Musk to thank for much of this.

They are easily observed, and you are far better off fearing them than an AI, vaccine or referendum!

They profit from various roles and enterprises by fostering doubt, casting aspersions and dividing society, and unlike an AI which acts mechanically without consciousness, these people do it deliberately.

Seriously, it's like the French Revolution never happened in Meta's version of history!
The Force Awakens!

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #19
AI should very much be feared. Its just a matter of when.....and its most likely not now.....and may not be for a long time.

The neural networking stuff is where things get weird. The AI teaches itself, and we don't know how it is actually doing it.

Its a black box.
We give it inputs, and we look at the outputs and tell it if its right or wrong and it adjusts itself as required.

It is already better at looking for diseases in x-rays than the best trained doctors.....and we dont know what it is seeing that we cannot.

I've mentioned it before, but look up "The end of the world with Josh Clark" podcast. It has an episode dedicated to AI and explains things a lot better than i could.

There was a part in it about how we need to be very careful with what we tell AI as it could very much end us by accident without the right fail safes involved.

It has an example. A paper clip company uses AI to become more efficient. Initially AI creates efficiency in production line, packaging etc. It looks at getting better materials to get the best quality paper clips. It can build machines to do this. It grows and grows and wants to maximise resources, be that land for mining, water for production. Eventually realises that humans are simply getting in the way and wipes us out as well to 'loot' our 'resources' to make better paper clips. It creates space ships to go mine asteroids for better materials etc etc.

Its a ludicrous scenario, and i've left out a lot of detail, but step by step, each next step is plausible and possible in the not too distant future.
I mean Kubrick was predicting this kind of (humans getting in the way) over 50 years ago with HAL in 2001.
"I'm sorry Dave, i'm afraid i can't do that"

It might not happen until long after we are all dead and buried...but it might happen sooner.
Moore's law makes it hard to comprehend how quickly and how advanced the future will be.
Throw in some quantum computing and anything is possible.

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #20
Whatever it takes?
Reality always wins in the end.

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #21
The fears over AI are greatly exaggerated, it's basically software, and currently it requires a high bandwidth 24x7 power intensive connection to the web to work, and because the web is full of shizen AI gets about 40% of it's answers wrong.

The AI we are exposed to like ChatGPT or OpenAI pretty much requires a server farm the size of the MCG to deliver 40% wrong answers in the timeframe people expect from a Google search.

The real problem is dumb-ar5e people believing the AI is always right without question, or nefarious types find ways to us AI to manipulate or con others. Either way the problem is people, not a hunk of silicon or a few lines of code.

Finally, the best of the best technology fails with even rudimentary human intervention. For example AI Drones can fall out of the sky or run into buildings just from someone turning the lights on or off, because machine vision isn't all it's cracked up to be, and it's not really intelligent in the way a person knows all trees are trees just from seeing just one up close.
The Force Awakens!

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #22
Im skeptical about AI, because ultimatey, machines don't learn without good data being fed to it.

Anyone who has ever had to look at a web application firewall can see that they are bloody hopeless and start blocking legitimate traffic for stupid reasons. 
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #23
You guys are talking about AI as it currently exists.

I'm talking about AI in the future, how far into the future is anybodys guess and its almost impossible to fathom.
Just like 100 years ago, it was impossible to fathom a contraption that could be used as a calculator doing basic mathematical operation any pre-schooler can do. When it eventually came to be, it was as big as a room. Now everyone carries that, and 100 other inventions capable of so much more, in their pocket.

What does 100 years from now look like??

30 years ago the thought of self driving cars was nothing more than sci fi nonsense. Now it exists.

Chat GPT is like the first fish that every crawled out of the water and onto land.
AI i'm talking about is humans taking over the planet.
There are a lot of steps from then to now, but it will happen. Time being the only unknown.

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #24
I think we must terminate this debate, where is @madbluboy‍ when you need him?

I think the idea of an all seeing all conquering Cognisant AI is greatly overstated, and if we create something with such a high level of intelligence then it's unlikely to unilaterally turn on it's creator. Not all AI if it ever exists is going to become Norman Bates!

We can imagine a lot of stuff, most of it will never be real!

A bigger issue is poor quality robotic automation, and a lot of what the media refers to as AI is mostly robotic automation, and it's not intelligent in any way! Intelligent in it's design but not encompassing intelligence.

Pretty soon Windows 11 users will be fully exposed to MS CoPilot and other similar "apparently smart" technologies, but they are just forms of robotic automation based on LLM and not AI at all! LLM is basically the data on the internet reduced to a library of relationships that can be searched for an answer, it's not that smart and most of the answers it will send right or wrong are parroted replies originally authored by humans before being repeated or rehashed by the LLM robotics. None of it can pass a Turing Test. It's rote learning on a massive scale, not understanding.
The Force Awakens!

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #25
I think we must terminate this debate, where is @madbluboy‍ when you need him?

I think the idea of an all seeing all conquering Cognisant AI is greatly overstated, and if we create something with such a high level of intelligence then it's unlikely to unilaterally turn on it's creator. Not all AI if it ever exists is going to become Norman Bates!

We can imagine a lot of stuff, most of it will never be real!

A bigger issue is poor quality robotic automation, and a lot of what the media refers to as AI is mostly robotic automation, and it's not intelligent in any way! Intelligent in it's design but not encompassing intelligence.

Pretty soon Windows 11 users will be fully exposed to MS CoPilot and other similar "apparently smart" technologies, but they are just forms of robotic automation based on LLM and not AI at all! LLM is basically the data on the internet reduced to a library of relationships that can be searched for an answer, it's not that smart and most of the answers it will send right or wrong are parroted replies originally authored by humans before being repeated or rehashed by the LLM robotics. None of it can pass a Turing Test. It's rote learning on a massive scale, not understanding.

Mate, you are still thinking 5 minutes down the road. You need to think decades into the future.

We are a lot closer than you think.
All it will take is some crazy Elon Musk style billionaire to go rogue and things get pretty tricky pretty quickly.

Nano-bots can do many weird and wonderful things and are expected to be a big player in our lifetime.
AI is already streets ahead of us in terms of some kinds of diagnoses.
Put the 2 together and we have AI finding issues and fixing us (for a small fee of course) in the not too distant future.

"The first ultraintelligent machine, is the last thing man will ever need to make."

Once this is achieved, it can design and improve upon itself quicker than we can keep up and its about then that we are just along for the ride.

We can already see some of this stuff occuring in our lifetimes.
The movie hidden figures about the african american women who were doing the calculations for NASA back in the day....us as humans, couldn't do the same thing now because we use computers to do it for us.
Logarithm slide rules etc, that had all come and gone before my time. Thats a computer thing now.
The better computers get at this stuff, the less we need to know it. Humanity, is largely getting dumber thanks to our current technologies.
We already have social media sites reading our minds and predicting our wants and needs as well as feeding us (mis)information changing how we vote without us even realising it.
As i mentioned earlier, our cars are starting to drive themselves, and it won't be long before we don't know how to drive ourselves.

The more technology does for us, the less we can do it for ourselves.
Soon that same technology will be better at everything we can do for ourselves.

Some of the smartest people in the world, Hawking,  Musk etc can see this as a potentially catastrophic threat, and i certainly don't see any reason to not agree with them.

Again, its just a matter of when....not if.

Individually, we may be long gone before we even get close.

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #26
If I'm not...I'll  be on their side. :D  :D


Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #28
Here is an AI version of Johnny Cash singing 'Barbie Girl'


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW1qjsqS1zM
This is now the longest premiership drought in the history of the Carlton Football Club - more evidence of climate change?

Re: AI and creativity.

Reply #29
Here is an AI version of Johnny Cash singing 'Barbie Girl'


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW1qjsqS1zM

I don't know whether to laugh or cry. The irony is good for a giggle (although I suspect the joke will wear thin pretty quickly), but come on ? Johnny Cash ? There really is nothing sacred left in this world.