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Topic: The EV thread (Read 7532 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: The EV thread

Reply #15
Care to elaborate on piece of crap?
They would be driving on the freeway in moderate conditions and it would go completely dead and roll to a stop, nothing, not even brake lights or emergency lights. Luckily it wasn't at night, however.

The dealer claimed there was nothing wrong with it, then further investigation from the owner found heaps of similar experiences from other users. The last time the dealer had it, the third time it had cut out, the dealer took it for a test drive and it cutout in traffic, no brake lights the vehicle following behind ran up it's ar5e. So this is a new vehicle, original owner only 3 months old and the dealer has pranged it. So you think it's a replace, no they want to send it for panel beating and repair and give it back 3 - 4 weeks later.

Piece of crap!
The Force Awakens!

Re: The EV thread

Reply #16
If I ever buy another vehicle in my life I will probably strongly consider an EV. As long as my present ICE vehicle keeps going then I'll probably settle for that. At my present  rate of distance covered per year I should be OK.

No big outback trips planned Cookie?
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: The EV thread

Reply #17
Tesla's battery warranties are a bit like getting the ball replaced in test cricket when it goes out of shape,  you get a refurbished battery with the same wear and tear in terms and years. Also most dont know there is no spare tyre or even dinky spacesaver due to their being no room in most Ev's including Tesla's and you get a tyre repair kit which if you have used them wont work for a lot of people and you will need to call the Tesla tech support to send the repair van. Given the weight of EV's they are also very prone to punctures as Tesla owners will tell you and tyres wear out way quicker with that extra weight and I suspect the extra torque created and you will be looking at a new set of Continentals much sooner than anticipated. Insurance is expensive and Elon Musk hasnt done much for the already poor depreciation value by keep dropping the new car price every time the opposition car makers come out with cheaper vehicles. You would want to be doing a fair few km's a year imo to make them worthwhile and Im with Cookie that I will be keeping my dirty polluting combustion vehicles for a while yet.
I wont be tempted by the cheap Chinese rubbish either even if they are selling well like they are now.....even though they account for close to 60% of the worlds EV's and counting.
If you do have to buy one then Krud has the right idea with the leasing angle and generous Govt subsidies for vehicles below $89K.

Re: The EV thread

Reply #18
Dunno about a lot of that EB.
I know a guy with a Tesla, the suv one, he made it sound like the spare was an option and even up here the Tesla roadside assist is a thing, I don’t know about the battery replacement situation.
I’m on a Thailand forum and the guys with the Chinese ev’s are very happy with them, build, ride, comfort and tech.
The tyre wear if it was ever a major issue, apparently there are tyres designed specifically for ev’s now.
Thats what I hear…
Let’s go BIG !

Re: The EV thread

Reply #19
Boss drives a Porsche Taycan Ev.  It's an amazing car.

I've generally heard great things from everyone who has an EV.

I suspect the early adopters won't be dissapointed.  The ones who will be most dissapointed will be when they hit the lower cost higher profit part of the equation.  Whilst their innovating you'll get the odd one that's a lemon but most of them will be fine because all the R and D is going into making them work rather than work cheaply.  Soon you'll get second rate versions hitting the market.

Like any other car really.  This isn't like the first EFI cars where they were different and worse initially.  This is a much bigger disruption. 

"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson


Re: The EV thread

Reply #21
Inverse has a good exploration of EV battery life and replacement costs based on actual data:

https://www.inverse.com/innovation/tesla-battery-life-replacement-cost

The site has many other objective EV articles.

“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: The EV thread

Reply #22
Inverse has a good exploration of EV battery life and replacement costs based on actual data:

https://www.inverse.com/innovation/tesla-battery-life-replacement-cost

The site has many other objective EV articles.



That article gives similar numbers to what the Chinese ev owners are claiming.
Did Tesla tweak their battery chemistry in 2017 or so ?
Let’s go BIG !

Re: The EV thread

Reply #23
Good day to get "Greta" the 5L 98 RON guzzler out and give her a good thrashing.

#farktheevs
2017-16th
2018-Wooden Spoon
2019-16th
2020-dare to dream? 11th is better than last I suppose
2021-Pi$$ or get off the pot
2022- Real Deal or more of the same? 0.6%
2023- "Raise the Standard" - M. Voss Another year wasted Bar Set
2024-Back to the drawing boardNo excuses, its time

Re: The EV thread

Reply #24
"According to the Australian Council of Recycling (ACOR), lithium-ion batteries cause at least three fires in recycling streams every day, but the real number of blazes is suspected to be much higher."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-29/lithium-ion-battery-fire-australian-recycling-industry/103380210?utm_campaign=abc_news_web&utm_content=link&utm_medium=content_shared&utm_source=abc_news_web

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWvI1daNils
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: The EV thread

Reply #25
A genuine alternative to EVs?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-29/toyota-hydrogen-cars-future-electric-vehicles-uptake-challenges/103390084?utm_campaign=abc_news_web&utm_content=link&utm_medium=content_shared&utm_source=abc_news_web

I hope Toyota perseveres ... and the petrochemical industry gets on board to bring down the cost of producing hydrogen.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: The EV thread

Reply #26
A genuine alternative to EVs?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-29/toyota-hydrogen-cars-future-electric-vehicles-uptake-challenges/103390084?utm_campaign=abc_news_web&utm_content=link&utm_medium=content_shared&utm_source=abc_news_web

I hope Toyota perseveres ... and the petrochemical industry gets on board to bring down the cost of producing hydrogen.
I think this is where Kruddlers argument is most important.  Which way is the future?  Odds are the car industry doesnt know.

The one thing that the car industry generally agrees on is that driverless vehicles are the future.  To be honest, I hope so.   There is an element of me first selfishness that has pervaded the roads for the last 10 years, where people are seemingly oblivious to driver etiquette and it all results in line jumping, delays, accidents, and general traffic slowdown. 
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: The EV thread

Reply #27
I think this is where Kruddlers argument is most important.  Which way is the future?  Odds are the car industry doesnt know.

The one thing that the car industry generally agrees on is that driverless vehicles are the future.  To be honest, I hope so.   There is an element of me first selfishness that has pervaded the roads for the last 10 years, where people are seemingly oblivious to driver etiquette and it all results in line jumping, delays, accidents, and general traffic slowdown. 

The thing is that there’s so much investment in EVs that manufacturers and governments don’t want to back another horse.

Hydrogen is earmarked for the next generation of heavy vehicles but Toyota is really the only company promoting the use for light vehicles.

Our environment doesn’t really suit EVs (outside of major population centres) or driverless vehicles; the latter can’t be programmed to deal with kangaroos, emus, etc.

I struggled at first when driving in the UK; the other drivers were incredibly considerate and courteous.  So different to the behaviour of most Aussie drivers 🤔
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: The EV thread

Reply #28
I think this is where Kruddlers argument is most important.  Which way is the future?  Odds are the car industry doesnt know.

The one thing that the car industry generally agrees on is that driverless vehicles are the future.  To be honest, I hope so.   There is an element of me first selfishness that has pervaded the roads for the last 10 years, where people are seemingly oblivious to driver etiquette and it all results in line jumping, delays, accidents, and general traffic slowdown.

Yep.

This is where the government need to do their homework, and IMO they are dropping the ball.

If you wanna make hydrogen the 'next big thing' then a good way to start is to try and retrofit existing petrol stations with the ability to have hydrogen fuelling there. Don't need to build brand new filling stations, use what we have.
As the hydrogen uptake gets more prominent, you could phase out pertrol and deisel more ad more at these stations. It can be a gradual changeover that grows with the market.
Now i don't know the logistics of that, but thats for the government to work out.

Of couse, they need to make sure that car manufacturers continue to go down this path as well....which is hard for them to know.
What would/could be beneficial is to build our own cars in Australia! Imagine that, become innovative in manufacturing again, rather than being at the beck and call of the rest of the world.

Imagine if we could manufacture and mine our own hydrogen and hydrogen cars. We'd be future proof. Don't worry about a pandemic cutting us off from the rest of the world again, we'd be self sufficient.

But governments don't think that way. So we are left in limbo.

Re: The EV thread

Reply #29
China have recognized the shortcomings of EVs for heavy transport, long range and Industrial uses and are investing in Hydrogen for those purposes but Hydrogen car sales have collapsed in Europe by 70% and fallen in other parts of the world.
China dont seem as interested in Hydrogen passenger vehicles which is shame even though home sales were the only ones in positive territory in the world in the past year.
https://www.hydrogeninsight.com/transport/shanghai-unveils-target-for-10-000-fuel-cell-vehicles-and-70-hydrogen-refuelling-stations-by-2025/2-1-1490002.

Aussies tend to vote and act with their hip pocket as the major guide and EV's are selling due to the cheap chinese vehicles flooding the market and unless hydrogen vehicles could be made cheaper and have better refuelling infrastructure its hard to see them taking off even if they are better for range, quicker to refill and probably suit Aus conditions better.
The debate reminds me of VHS vs Beta.....the latter was the superior technical product but VHS had the better marketing and won the day...