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Re: General Discussions

Reply #315
It's an interesting subject.

I remember in my primary school days we did a fair bit of work on the "Australian aborigine".
We studied their food, shelter, weapons and food gathering utensils and art.
It was very much the 'nomadic tribal' perspective.
The urban side of things didn't get a look in

In my last years of teaching there was a significant change and depending on the area I was working there was a lot more focus on local aboriginal history. Indigenous teachers aides and elders all participated in instruction.

One of the issues I found working in Juvenile Justice where my classes were sometimes 100% indigenous (yep, Seriously over represented, but that' another topic) was that we were drawing students from all parts of the state (NSW) and there was a bit of a disconnect between kids from different areas. So lessons had to be of a general nature.
I was taught zero Lods both at Primary and High School, today I'm appalled by that fact.
2017 - 16th
2018 - Wooden Spoon
2019 - 16th
2020 - dare to dream? 11th is better than last I suppose
2021 - Pi$$ or get off the pot

 

Re: General Discussions

Reply #316
Sack the f-wit immediately if that's true. I have maintained for a long time that we DONT LEARN ENOUGH at school about Indigenous Australia and its culture.

Absofcknlutely. And as a part of the curriculum - respect. Respect for their spirituality, their arts and their culture.

I think we're heading in the right direction, and so we should be.

I still cannot fathom folks who are opposed (threatened?) by the emphasis in genuinely acknowledging our indigenous folks. All that is required is the empathy and imagination to truly put yourself in the skin of these folks... and understand what they've been through, who they are, and then, what they have to offer/share. Then acknowledge that difference is okay, in fact, good... we can learn from each other, and share our mutual gifts, then grow together allowing each to their own, surrendering the need to change and convert.

Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: General Discussions

Reply #317
My wife and daughter are teachers, brilliant ones at that (no bias) so I wouldn't tar them all with the same brush. However, if you want to see how low the standards have plummeted and if you can bring yourself down to the level, purely for investigative purposes, watch a few episodes of Married At First Sight that just finished. There was a young lass on the series that was a teacher, good lord I wouldn't entrust her with teaching a dog/cat let alone a child.

I wouldn't think anyone on those reality shows is a fair representation of their demographic / profession - I haven't looked into it, and nor do I intend to, but I'd bet London to a brick that all those contestants are specifically chosen because they exhibit psychopathic tendencies. 
Solo piano

Re: General Discussions

Reply #318
I wouldn't think anyone on those reality shows is a fair representation of their demographic / profession - I haven't looked into it, and nor do I intend to, but I'd bet London to a brick that all those contestants are specifically chosen because they exhibit psychopathic tendencies.

Agree. They are all about gaining audience numbers rather than being attempts to mirror the current state of society. Personally  I never watch, if I can avoid it.
Reality always wins in the end.

Re: General Discussions

Reply #319
My wife and daughter are teachers, brilliant ones at that (no bias) so I wouldn't tar them all with the same brush. However, if you want to see how low the standards have plummeted and if you can bring yourself down to the level, purely for investigative purposes, watch a few episodes of Married At First Sight that just finished. There was a young lass on the series that was a teacher, good lord I wouldn't entrust her with teaching a dog/cat let alone a child.

My three grandsons are at primary school and their school is brilliant.  Their teachers are devoted, energetic and great at imparting knowledge and building a thirst for knowledge (helped by parents and grandparents!).  Their curriculum is much broader than it was back in my day (the dark ages) but that hasn’t hindered reading, writing and mathematics - my oldest grandson is in year 6 and is doing year 8 mathematics.  The fact that his teacher picked up the need to challenge him with more advanced mathematics speaks volumes for him and the school.

Of course there are dud teachers - I had more than my share - but most do a very hard job very well.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: General Discussions

Reply #320
My three grandsons are at primary school and their school is brilliant.  Their teachers are devoted, energetic and great at imparting knowledge and building a thirst for knowledge (helped by parents and grandparents!).  Their curriculum is much broader than it was back in my day (the dark ages) but that hasn’t hindered reading, writing and mathematics - my oldest grandson is in year 6 and is doing year 8 mathematics.  The fact that his teacher picked up the need to challenge him with more advanced mathematics speaks volumes for him and the school.

Of course there are dud teachers - I had more than my share - but most do a very hard job very well.

It's a thankless job. I think teaching kids in primary and selective high schools would be the go. If I was a teacher, I would steer clear of normal high schools. And in the public sector, having savage funding cuts year after year must take its toll after a while. It's a real credit to the teaching profession that our outcomes are at the level they are, all things considered.
Solo piano

Re: General Discussions

Reply #321
I wouldn't think anyone on those reality shows is a fair representation of their demographic / profession - I haven't looked into it, and nor do I intend to, but I'd bet London to a brick that all those contestants are specifically chosen because they exhibit psychopathic tendencies. 
Nonetheless, he occupation was a teacher and she couldn't string two words together nor pronounce them properly. Like the show, she was embarrassing.
2017 - 16th
2018 - Wooden Spoon
2019 - 16th
2020 - dare to dream? 11th is better than last I suppose
2021 - Pi$$ or get off the pot

Re: General Discussions

Reply #322
My wife and daughter are teachers, brilliant ones at that (no bias) so I wouldn't tar them all with the same brush. However, if you want to see how low the standards have plummeted and if you can bring yourself down to the level, purely for investigative purposes, watch a few episodes of Married At First Sight that just finished. There was a young lass on the series that was a teacher, good lord I wouldn't entrust her with teaching a dog/cat let alone a child.

I don't recall saying that nor ever implying it GTC.  I did learn about Aboriginal culture heavily in 1971 and '72 and got a 98 / A score in the Australian History Matriculation exam later that year.  And a free scholarship to University on the back of the other three "A" scores I managed in other subjects.

But I strongly object to the fantasies of Bruce Pascoe being paraded as fact.

And I was at pains to stress a well rounded education, something that is sadly lacking in today's classrooms.  God knows the number of CVs I've dismissed after a single reading because of grammar and spelling, simple math by mind, not machine ... the very basics of communication.

We have a third grade education system yet all the amenities and comforts never present when I went through high school.  We just had an abundance of quality in the teaching ranks

Re: General Discussions

Reply #323
I don't recall saying that nor ever implying it GTC.  I did learn about Aboriginal culture heavily in 1971 and '72 and got a 98 / A score in Matriculation later that year.  And a free scholarship to University on the back of the other three "A" scores I managed in other subjects.

But I strongly object to the fantasies of Bruce Pascoe being paraded as fact.

And I was at pains to stress a well rounded education, something that is sadly lacking in today's classrooms.  God knows the number of CVs I've dismissed after a single reading because of grammar and spelling, simple math by mind, not machine ... the very basics of communication.

We have a third grade education system yet all the amenities and comforts never present when I went through high school.  We just had an abundance of quality in the teaching ranks

I have checked every primary source Pascoe cites and he has used them faithfully.

While I think that the desire to classify pre-contact Aboriginal economy as agricultural rather than hunter-gatherer is an over reaction to stereotypical views of Aboriginal people as wandering nomads, there is substantial evidence of sophisticated plant husbandry and storage and trading of surplus production.

I have worked quite a lot on the aquaculture sites in Victoria’s southwest and they provide evidence of generational planning, communal engineering, resource husbandry and social organisation that is at least as sophisticated as 19th century agricultural societies ... and that’s what should be taught in schools.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: General Discussions

Reply #324
I was taught zero Lods both at Primary and High School, today I'm appalled by that fact.
Same here, I was taught nothing about indigenous culture and my introduction to it was Syd Jackson in a Carlton jumper and two foster boys we had at the Technical School I went to. Reg and Arthur were 18 years of age in Form 4 as it was then and I had never seen an aboriginal person close up before and knew nothing about their culture. They were great cricketers and scared the crap out of other schools when we played them, no helmets, batting gloves with those green rubber spikes and Arthur pushing off the boundary bowling at a rapid rate, the other teams would hit the ball in the air just to get caught and get to safety.
But the sad reality was if it wasnt for sport I wouldnt have had any idea what they were about and they could have been from mars which is a sad reflection on the White Australia policy era.
My wifes sister is married to a part aboriginal gent and he is as white as anglo saxon me but always refers to himself jokingly as a black fella but he too had zero education in indigenous matters and he told me he was told by teachers he would be better off pretending he was fully white..

Re: General Discussions

Reply #325
I was taught at a catholic school

Remember an aboriginal man come speak to us on two occasions about the dreaming, their art, their weapons.  We did some aboriginal drawings of native animals and matchstick art where we used dots lines and earthy colours with white paint on black paper.

That was the 90's

Ive learned more at work in public sector health.

Out in public I've been threatened with a knife by one and his mate.  Unfortunate incident/misunderstanding on a tram where things got heated for no good reason.

Its where I established theres good and bad in all races.

Come on you Blue FLAGGERS!!

"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: General Discussions

Reply #326
The Victorian government has become the country’s largest employer to include the term “chestfeeding” in a workplace agreement as part of a broader push to use gender-inclusive language.

I think it's time we kibosh the lot, politicians, bureaucrats and social workers, it costs us billion$ for wearing this sort of tripe!
The Force Awakens!

Re: General Discussions

Reply #327
The Victorian government has become the country’s largest employer to include the term “chestfeeding” in a workplace agreement as part of a broader push to use gender-inclusive language.

I think it's time we kibosh the lot, politicians, bureaucrats and social workers, it costs us billion$ for wearing this sort of tripe!

I just don't get it. Are we embarrassed to use the word 'breast'?
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: General Discussions

Reply #328
Someone's gotta justify this feel good garbage.  No better sucker than the taxpayer.

Re: General Discussions

Reply #329
And what are we to make of "bottom feeder" under this new regime??
Reality always wins in the end.