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Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2205
Paul, I'll pay that   😄

Thanks EB. We shouldn't be too hard on the Chinese. In terms of manufacturing quality, they make things to the quality required by the person / entity commissioning the goods. They can make things as good as anyone. They just seem to be where everybody goes to make junk.

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2206
They can't make a car to save themselves though Paul :)

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2207
Interesting article outlining China’s very effective response to US claims about the “China Virus”:

Quote
Meanwhile, powerful voices in the US – from former President Trump to congressional Republicans – were working to rebrand COVID-19 as “the China virus,” amplifying fringe theories that it had been engineered by Chinese scientists.

Social media accounts that appeared to be pro-Trump or QAnon followers pushed the disinformation, repeatedly retweeting identical content that claimed China created the virus as a bioweapon, researchers at the Australia Institute’s Centre for Responsible Technology found.

As US rhetoric intensified, China went on the offensive. On February 22, People’s Daily ran a report highlighting speculation that the US military brought the virus to China, pushing the story globally through inserts in newspapers such as the Helsinki Times in Finland and the New Zealand Herald.

https://www.smh.com.au/world/asia/anatomy-of-a-conspiracy-with-covid-china-took-leading-role-20210215-p572ow.html

Their cars might be rubbish but they’re up there with Russia when it comes to manipulating social and mainstream media.
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2208
On this point, though, they were fighting fire with fire. Good on them for fighting back against disinformation with disinformation.

No doubt a very good case can be mounted that China should have done more to lockdown the early outbreak and should have done more to warn the international community. But Trump showed that cover-ups and minimising the risks wasn’t just part of his own playbook - it was his whole playbook. How the US could cry foul is beyond me, particularly as Trump had pulled out the US epidemiologist who was embedded in the Chinese pandemic response team just prior to the outbreak.

Does that mean other countries like Australia don’t have a right to complain? No, but: Superpower! Now, China matches the US for power and exceptionalism. What do we want to achieve by holding the Chinese to account? They’re not going to pay reparations or allow an international team to come into China to surveil their future pandemic responses. If we want the latter, we’ll need to win a war against them and then impose inspections à la Iraq. Hell, we can’t even expect an apology.

But returning to my first point, labelling Covid by its country of origin has been actively discouraged by epidemiologists. Doing so plays into the hands of racists and increases attacks on Asians. Anyone seen the video of the elderly Thai-American who was crash-tackled while walking on a footpath with such force he died? Or a picture of another Asian-American who has a large scar from 1 side of his face to the other after being slashed with a box-cutter? Hopefully, we have less to fear as we don’t have Trump’s terrorist army to deal with but the risk remains.

That just deals with the coronavirus. Of course, China has chosen to bully Australia and that naturally inspires anger. The blame for that is squarely China’s.

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2209
I see Craig Kelly has bug out of the Coalition to the crossbench, he thinks he is Australia's Donald! ;D

You'll see a heap of this prior to the next election, wannabes who think they can be king off the back of radicals, it will be interesting to see how they survive in a compulsory voting system. Voter fragmentation will ultimately become an issue, so you find more and more cooperation between the main parties.

Personally, we need to make them responsible for their rhetoric, and send a few to the wall for the trouble they cause. But, I can see it happening as politicians are too sensitive to changes that might come back to bite them!
The Force Awakens!

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2210
I see Craig Kelly has bug out of the Coalition to the crossbench, he thinks he is Australia's Donald! ;D

You'll see a heap of this prior to the next election, wannabes who think they can be king off the back of radicals, it will be interesting to see how they survive in a compulsory voting system. Voter fragmentation will ultimately become an issue, so you find more and more cooperation between the main parties.

Personally, we need to make them responsible for their rhetoric, and send a few to the wall for the trouble they cause. But, I can see it happening as politicians are too sensitive to changes that might come back to bite them!

The collective IQ of the crossbench has just taken a massive hit and common sense is now all but absent.  On a brighter note, the chances of the Member for Hughes being re-elected are very slim.  That should see a significant lift in collective IQ of our national parliament and a similar boost to its powers of reason   :)
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2211
Craig Kelly took an IQ test and celebrated his negative result!

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2212
A positive Covid story with a number of very humourous twists. I saw the article in the NYT and today it popped up in The Age - so due acknowledgement to these two publications.

A story to warm the cockles...

Ask Lucia DeClerck how she has lived to be 105, and she is quick with an answer.

“Prayer. Prayer. Prayer,” she offers. “One step at a time. No junk food.”

Lucia DeClerck, 105, said her secret to a long life was simple. “Prayer. Prayer. Prayer,” she said. “One step at a time. No junk food.”
But surviving the coronavirus, she said, also may have had something to do with another staple: the nine gin-soaked golden raisins she has eaten each morning for most of her life.

“Fill a jar,” she explained. “Nine raisins a day after it sits for nine days.”

Her children and grandchildren recall the ritual as just one of DeClerck’s endearing lifelong habits, like drinking aloe juice straight from the container and brushing her teeth with baking soda. (That worked, too: She did not have a cavity until she was 99, relatives said.)

“We would just think, ‘Grandma, what are you doing? You’re crazy’,” said her 53-year-old granddaughter, Shawn Laws O’Neil, of Los Angeles. “Now the laugh is on us. She has beaten everything that’s come her way.”
It is a long list. Born in 1916 in Hawaii to parents who came from Guatemala and Spain, she lived through the Spanish flu, two world wars and the deaths of three husbands and a son.

She moved to Wyoming, California and back to Hawaii before finally arriving in New Jersey, where she lived with her oldest son. After turning 90, she moved to an adult community in Manahawkin, New Jersey, along the Jersey Shore, where she remained active until she injured herself in a fall about four years ago.

“She is just the epitome of perseverance,” O’Neil said. “Her mind is so sharp. She will remember things when I was a kid that I don’t even remember.”

DeClerck, the oldest resident of her South Jersey nursing home, learned that she had contracted the virus on her 105th birthday, January 25, the day after she had gotten her second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, according to Michael Neiman, the home’s administrator.

At first, she said she was scared. She did not like being isolated, and she missed the daily chatter from the parade of caregivers at Mystic Meadows Rehabilitation and Nursing, a 120-bed facility in Little Egg Harbour.

She showed few symptoms, Neiman said. And within two weeks she was back in her room, holding her rosary beads and wearing her trademark sunglasses and knit hat.

To her two surviving sons, five grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and 11 great-great grandchildren, who call her Grandma Lucia, she has a new moniker, O’Neil said: “The 105-year-old badass who kicked COVID.”

On Monday, she got a shout-out from Governor Phil Murphy, who described a phone call with her during a coronavirus news briefing.

“What an uplifting conversation,” the Governor said.

DeClerck’s family gathered in January 2020 at Mystic Meadows to celebrate her 104th birthday before the onset of the pandemic. When they learned that she had contracted the virus, they braced for the worst.

“We were very concerned,” her son, Phillip Laws, 78, said.

“But she’s got a tenacity that is unbelievable,” he added. “And she’s got that rosary – all the time.”

A devout Catholic, DeClerck led rosary prayers each week at the nursing home and, before the pandemic, was a fixture at weekly Mass.

She raised three sons and ran a corner store for decades with her first husband, Henry Laws jnr, in Los Angeles. She married twice more after returning to Hawaii, where she worked as a home health aide and welcomed grandchildren for summer-long visits.

As the Australian Government rolls out its ambitious COVID-19 vaccination plan, who will get vaccinated first? And what vaccine will they get?

DeClerck is one of 62 residents of Mystic Meadows to have contracted the virus; four patients died, including three who were receiving hospice care, Neiman said.

“We’re as careful as possible,” he said, “but this finds a way of sneaking in.”

In January, residents were being tested twice a week, and a rapid test in the last week of the month showed that DeClerck had contracted the virus.

“At first she was a little apprehensive, a little scared, but she said, ‘God will protect me’,” Neiman said.

She had also been vaccinated, which most likely contributed to her recovery. The first studies of Britain’s mass inoculation program showed strong evidence on Monday that even one dose of vaccine can help slash coronavirus-related hospitalisations.

DeClerck is not the oldest person to beat the virus.

Europe’s oldest-known resident, Sister André, contracted the virus at 116. She celebrated with a glass of champagne on her 117th birthday earlier this month at a nursing home in Toulon, a city in south-eastern France.

Like Sister André, DeClerck may be ready for a toast.

But it is likely to involve gin and a handful of golden raisins. Her family is following suit.

“Now all of us are rushing out and getting Mason jars and yellow raisins and trying to catch up,” O’Neil said.
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2213
Craig Kelly took an IQ test and celebrated his negative result!

 :))  :))  :))  :))  :)) ...and apparently he spelt his name incorrectly on the test...
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2214
:))  :))  :))  :))  :)) ...and apparently he spelt his name incorrectly on the test...

According to Crage, he got his name right; everyone else is mistaken  ::)
“Why don’t you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don’t you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don’t you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?”  Oddball


Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2216
Read a story on the ABC about two aged care residents who were given 4 times the dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-02-24/coronavirus-queensland-vaccine-overdose-aged-care-brisbane/13179280

Hopefully nothing untoward occurs here.



The doctor was untrained in administering the vaccine... WTF  :o  :o
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2217
The doctor was untrained in administering the vaccine... WTF  :o  :o
Just like the security guards in Vic Hotel Quarantine 1.0 weren't trained, how Hotels in general aren't suitable environments for proper quarantine control.
2017 - 16th
2018 - Wooden Spoon
2019 - 16th
2020 - dare to dream?
2021 - Pi$$ or get off the pot

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2218
Just like the security guards in Vic Hotel Quarantine 1.0 weren't trained, how Hotels in general aren't suitable environments for proper quarantine control.

Its ok, they were saying they are going to use Robots in hotel quarantine now.

What could possibly go wrong?

Re: CV and mad panic behaviour

Reply #2219
Its ok, they were saying they are going to use Robots in hotel quarantine now.

What could possibly go wrong?

Daleks?
It’s OK when we do it.............