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Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

We entered this season with a lot of hope, as our team on paper looked good. We lost 3 close games that we should have won and had one absolute howler. That was enough in a very close season.
To be honest, in 2020 we looked to be playing at our best when the season finished: I think we could well have been premiers. Our game style was good, and our good players were playing well.
So, what happened that we missed out this time?

[1]   Player fitness and availability:
This was a big issue. We didn’t have our players fit and available when we needed them. Chloe Dalton missed the entire season, trying to get to Olympics that may not occur yet (depending on how Japan handles Covid-19). I understand why she took the chance: playing for your country doesn’t occur that often and she could well win a Gold Medal yet. But we missed her run and carry, her pace, her tackling and her goal kicking.
Brooke Walker was another significant miss with a foot injury. She played 2 games at the end of the season, but never hit her best. Very hard to do after her sort of injury. But that also hurt our attacking structure, as Walker and Dalton have express pace and use it with our Pagan’s Paddock style.
Gabby Pound missed the opening rounds, and that cost us goals. We probably would have won with her presence in defence.
Lucy McEvoy missed much of the season and didn’t hit her straps. Again, her injury did not allow her to get match fit.
Considering how important these players are, this was a significant hole in our side. And then Mimi Hill did her knee. Personally, I think she was a monte for the Rising Star Award, but she didn’t even get a mention. Her run and skill were missed. And I didn’t even mention Katie Loynes.

[2]   Form and Fitness of Tayla Harris:
Tay had a big year in 2020. Her boxing career really took off, and her Young Australian of the Year was amazing. Her 2020 form was good enough to win games. So, what happened in 2021? Tay’s form was very much down, and she kicked few goals. She didn’t look 100% fit at any stage. She has had knee issues that that seemed to slow her down considerably in 2021. Certainly, she didn’t take the number of big pack marks that she did in 2019 and 2020. Her spectacular marking in those seasons really set off our forward line, which otherwise is quite short. She did lead quite a way up the ground and got a lot of kicks a long way from goal.
As Tay is our primary marking option in the forward line, her form really left a huge hole in our forward structure. Darcy Vescio and Nik Stevens had to become marking targets, and while their form rose, we still missed that nig mark in the forward line.
I don’t know Tay’s heart was in this season as it has been in previous ones. That may sound harsh, but she simply didn’t throw herself at the ball like she had earlier. Her speed wasn’t there, which suggests her knees may have been issues. But she did play.
One of the things that really disappointed me was that Tayla couldn’t buy a free kick. The number of times she was interfered with, that her arms were chopped and that she was tackled and not rewards with free kicks was amazing. There was discussion that she might be playing for frees, but it didn’t look that way to me. She could well have got frees within goal kicking distance late in game in 2 of our losses, but they were not paid. Is she a victim of her own high profile?
I am not sure, but unless we have more marking power in our forward half, we are going to struggle to kick winning scores.

[3]   Our ruck Situation:
We are blessed to have a great ruck in Bree Moody. The woman is athletic, strong and can do almost anything. When she wins in the ruck, we generally win.
However, when she does not win in the ruck, as was especially the case against North Melbourne, we get caned.
In previous seasons we had Alison Downie as our other ruck. In 2019 we almost won because of Downie’s great form. She managed to get her hand on the ball no matter how awkward it may have looked, and we usually got the clearance as a result. Her form around the ground was also good, if not as spectacular as Moody’s. Again, in 2020 Downie did well, meaning that we never lost the ruck.
This season Downie struggled in the ruck and couldn’t make much of an impact. When moved into defence late, Downie played much better, but Father Time caught up with one of our most important players.
But it was in the ruck that she was missed. Moody played a lot more on the ball and often ran out of gas late in games. Moody ran herself into the ground, but she was considerably less effective in last quarters than she was in 1st quarters.
As a result, our last quarters were simply not as effective as they could be, and we were often run over at the end.
Serena Gibbs came in and looked promising, but her ruck work was not up to scratch. She looked more comfortable as a forward, and that is where I would play her. Gibbs needs to hold more of her marks, but she showed that she has a future.
If we are going to succeed in 2022, we need another decent ruck to complement Moody, as she simply cannot do it all on her own.

Parts 4 to 7 coming soon.
Live Long and Prosper!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #1
[4]   Centre Issues:
Without the ruck dominance and with a number of important players missing or injured, our mids were not as effective as they have been in the past. Maddie Prepakis was again a standout, but the support she required was not always there. Both Grace Egan and Lucy McEvoy did not enjoy seasons as good as last year, co-Captain Katie Loynes missed too much and was not at her physical best and Dalton was missing entirely. Jess Hosking stepped up and had probably her best season. Abby McKay stepped up and made significant improvements as a midfielder. Mimi Hill was very good when she was available, but our midfield was not as able to cope with Collingwood’s or North’s.
Grace Egan had some excellent games, her poise and disposal were excellent, but she isn’t a 4-quarter 20 – 30 possession player yet. There were good signs, but she needs consistency.
Maddy P had to deal with a lot more tagging this season, with some of it being considerably suspect. She could have managed to get a lot more frees if the umpires bothered to look. She was unlucky to be rubbed out for a game. It is easier to tag Maddy than some others because she does not have express pace. Maddy probably isn’t going to get a lot faster, but if we design our centre square reasonably, we could help her considerably. Certainly, she was marked before the season started.
Lucy McEvoy wasn’t really fit enough in any of her games, as she missed too much pre-season. Her form was not as impressive as last year, and she didn’t spend all that much time in the centre square. I hope she will be better next year. But for that she needs some hard work and VFL game time. I am not sure she will get it.
The major problem was stopping opposition mids. We found that much harder this season and really need to work on this area of our game. Last year we managed to really stop the opposition’s best mids. This year they ran around too easily too often. Lots of teams had their mids get big numbers against us. We need to develop a tagger, as Jess Edwards doesn’t quite do the job well enough. God knows she tried, but she has been in and out since her debut and she isn’t that young.

[5]   Defence Issues:
Like our mids, our defenders did not reach the heights of last year. They were under pressure a lot more often this year, as our midfield was less effective, and most of them were down on form for parts of the season.
There were also structural problems, as our defence is not overly tall. Ali Downie covered at least some of this in the last half of the season, as she covered the tallest forward pretty well, but she has now retired.
Early in the season we missed Gab Pound. Teams like North, Western Bulldogs and Collingwood got goals the may not have kicked had she been available. Harrington and Laluifi had to be used in more defensive roles: this really robbed us of run from defence.
Harrington picked up her form significantly in the last few games but struggled early to make an impact. In the early part of the season, she had to play a lot more defensively, and while she did her job well enough, we lost her run from defence. It affected her game quite a lot. Later, when she got her mojo back, she was brilliant running the ball out of defence and setting up our forwards.
Charlotte Wilson was good, but not as dominant as in 2020. Last year she slaughtered Sabrina Frederick, this year the contest was much more even. Her kicking is also something that needs considerable work. She often had the run out of defence role early in the season and her kicking was not reliable enough to get the job done. She also improved over the season.
Mua Lalolifi had a strong season but did not stand out as much as she did in 2020. Teams were more aware of her and managed to stop her running away from contests with the ball as much. Her interceptions were excellent, but she still had to play a more negative role.
Gab Pound was missed. We played better when she returned but missing the start of the season was a big negative. We must start looking for a replacement, as she is not getting any younger.
Maddy Guerin played some games in defence and looked to have a future, but she isn’t the answer yet. Similarly, Daisy Walker debuted and did some good things. She has pace, but her disposal is her weakness at this point. She appeared to have the coach’s favour. Charlotte Hammans also showed potential. She also has pace.
Over all, our defence looks sound and has some nice kids coming through, but it needs that injection of pace and could well do with a taller defender.
Live Long and Prosper!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #2
Bit harsh on Greg crash.
Thought her 2021 was far superior than her 2020.
She has some awareness issues and based on what some of her team-mates have said about her, it's not just on the footy field.  :-[

You made no mention of Brooke Vernon in our backs and her injury.
Re new backs I'd have daisy walker, guerin and then hammans in terms of long term options.


For mine priorities this off season is a taller key back and or backup ruck.
Our late signing Paige Trudgeon could be that player, but I don't know much about her apart from the fact she is the same height as Moody.

I think we need to make a minimum of 3 changes (possibly 4 with getting Chloe Dalton back)
Loynes and Downie are 2.
I think Edwards should be a 3rd as for all her heart her talent is just lacking.
Maybe one of the girls who have failed to crack it for a game.would be 4th.


Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #3
Bit harsh on Greg crash.
Thought her 2021 was far superior than her 2020.
She has some awareness issues and based on what some of her team-mates have said about her, it's not just on the footy field.  :-[
Perhaps I was, but the girl could be just so good.  Her disposal is usually fantastic. But she goes missing ...

You made no mention of Brooke Vernon in our backs and her injury.
Re new backs I'd have Daisy Walker, Guerin and then Hammans in terms of long term options.
I was going to mention Brooke Vernon elsewhere. I hope she can come up, as she is one of the taller defenders on our list, but she seems to be more than a little injury prone. I hope she plays a lot in the VFLW, as it will help her development no end.

For mine priorities this off season is a taller key back and or backup ruck.
Our late signing Paige Trudgeon could be that player, but I don't know much about her apart from the fact she is the same height as Moody.
Trudgeon has been playing in the VFLW and appears to have a good set of hands and a nice kick, but she appears to be pretty slow. I've only seen highlights, so I can't comment on the ruck work, but Jorja Borg is definitely the No.1 ruck at that level. She does stand out, but at the moment has a fair way to go before she can take over from Ali Downie. However, I can hope.

I think we need to make a minimum of 3 changes (possibly 4 with getting Chloe Dalton back)
Loynes and Downie are 2.
I think Edwards should be a 3rd as for all her heart her talent is just lacking.
Maybe one of the girls who have failed to crack it for a game would be 4th.
I am thinking similarly to you, Krudd, Edwards has a lot going for her, but she isn't good enough at stopping star players, she isn't fast enough to run them down and she generally doesn't get enough of the ball. She is a great trier, but I can only see her coming in if we get a number of injuries.
Like you, I have no idea who might be the 4th delisting or trade. Courtney Jones and Winnie Laing haven't got senior games yet, but they are both young and developing in the VFLW. I wouldn't consider flicking either of those, or trading them.
We already have one of the youngest lists in the competition. I can't see anyone be flicked.
Live Long and Prosper!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #4
[6]   Game Plan:
With our girls up and firing, our game plans runs pretty well. We are a high-pressure team that gets a lot of run-down tackles (of which only a fraction are rewarded, but that is another tale). Even in the games we lost, our pressure on the opposition was good (with the exception of North Melbourne).
However, this season we were often not at our best. As a result, our game plan was not as effective.
We basically play a variation on Pagan’s Paddock, with our mids running deep into defence to help out and our forward coming up the ground. We often outnumber the opposition at the fall of the ball. The question, however, is when we try to get the ball out of defence.
This year we kicked the ball to the opposition wall, whereupon the ball would come back in and be locked in for extended periods in the opposition forward line. This puts a lot of pressure on our defenders, and we leaked goals in the first few rounds.
Our game plan assumed a couple of things that were not true in 2021:
(a)   The first assumption was that we could kick over the wall and let our fast forward gets the ball over the back.
That didn’t happen. With our defenders under pressure, the kicks were not going over the back, they were landing in position where we were outnumbered 2 or 3 to one. Our defenders were not getting the run to be able to put the ball over the top, nor did we have anyone to do the job with an extra-long kick.
(b)   The second assumption was that Tayla Harris would either get the mark or bring the ball to ground. That didn’t happen either. Outnumbered most times, Tayla didn’t attack the ball with her trademark ferocity and abandon. Yes, she took some marks, but she didn’t take a lot of them. Opposition teams also appeared to be more aware of her capability to take contested marks out of nothing. I am assuming that it was Tayla’s ongoing knee issue that stopped her doing this.
This also meant that either Darcy Vescio or Nik Stevens had to try that role, and they are neither tall nor strong enough to make it work. With no other key forward as a marking target, that was a huge fail.
(c)   The third assumption was that, as the ball got over the top, our fast forwards would run onto the ball and score. In 2019 and 2020 that worked well, but in 2021 we didn’t have Brooke Walker or Chloe Dalton to do the job. Their replacement, Elise O’Dea, offered considerable leadership, but she didn’t have much pace.
All in all, that part of our game plan really didn’t work as often as it could have.

[7]   Kicking to stationary targets:
A pet peeve of mine is when my team habitually kicks to players standing still, especially in deep in defence. It was far more obvious in the first few games of the year, but it was something that happened far too often.
I understand that the skill level in AFLW is not yet what it is for AFL, but it is very much to our advantage if we DON’T kick to stationary targets.
Why?
(a)   One of the more important reasons is that our young list is neither huge, nor muscled like Arnold Schwarzenegger. They have to be, sometimes, to survive contact with one or two fast moving opponents, coming in trying to spoil or intercept. A standing target has no momentum (p = m.v), while the opposition player has a lot. When the collision comes, our player is likely to be knocked off her feet. Even if she isn’t, the ball will be knocked away from our goal with the opposing player starting at close to her fastest velocity, while our player is at rest.
For example, when the stationary player is Georgia Gee (who would barely weight 50 kg absolutely sodden) or Maddy P (who is a great player, but who is not over endowed in speed), then we are at a disadvantage that cannot be overcome.
(b)   Secondly, it gives the opposition hope of intercepting the ball and really raised their confidence when they do make an interception, especially if our girl is taken to the ground and effectively out of the play.
(c)    It gives the opposing player legal opportunities to hurt our girls. That is a real negative. The bumps might be going out of the game, the collisions are becoming harder, as the players get faster and more athletic. Setting a team mate up as a potential victim in a poor way to operate!
On the other hand, I am quite happy if we are the aggressors in this situation. Certainly, one of the useful affects of Tayla Harris splitting the packs in recent years is not only that she is more likely to get the ball, but that it takes opposition players to the ground and effectively out of the action while we try to get and move the ball.
In any case, I feel this was a feature of our game at times this year and I would rather it disappear from our game.

[8]   Our inability to get goals from packs:
A point I would like to bring up about this season was something very noticeable in our losses, especially early in the season. We would trap the ball in our half for extended periods, but not score the vital goals. This was very noticeable in the Collingwood and Western Bulldogs games, which we could well have won.
(a)   Firstly, with Tayla Harris being our only tall target, we took very few pack marks close to goal this year. Opposing teams knew that they had only the one target to cover.
Similarly, Serena Gibbs took no pack marks. That is a side of her game to work on. She didn’t appear to have the leap, but I am willing to give her the benefit of the doubt there.
(b)   Secondly, our small forward were often swamped around the packs and unable to get off snaps. One reason is that it took too long to get the ball from hand to foot. Another thing was that very few of our snaps under pressure went through for goals. Most got intercepted before reaching the goal line.
(c)   We usually built quite a good wall to keep the ball in, but a couple of time we were caught fumbling, and goals were scored against us.
I think we need to put more time into that situation. Moving the ball along that outer wall and kicking to a leading target would be a better bet than just kicking and hoping. The other thing is that our defensive girls are not generally super long kicks. To be able to kick further than the opposition expects gives us more room to lead into, as the bulk of opposing defenders have to consider the long ball.
Live Long and Prosper!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #5
[9]   Fitness:
It was true that we did not do well in last quarters this year. Our usual mode of play was to strike early and try to protect our lead. In generally low scoring games, that often doesn’t work. I’d like to think that our girls can run over anyone else at the end of a game, something we have seen in earlier years.
One of the major issues there was the decline of Ali Downie. In the past, we shared the ruck duties and usually had a fit and competent ruck ready to fire in the last quarter. This was not the case this year. Not only did Ali take relatively few ruck contests, but she struggled at them. As a result, Bree Moody did a lot more ruck work and ran herself into the ground. She was unable to lift in the last quarter because her workload was so much greater than it has been. There were a number of games when this was clear. Against Fremantle, for example, Moody killed her opponents in the first half. However, as the game went on, the Freo ruck combination wore her down. As a result, we managed very few clearances in the last quarter, while Freo managed a couple of quick goals from centre clearances. It was, literally, the difference between winning and losing.
In that game Serena Gibbs did some ruck work. At the moment her ruck work needs considerable improvement: she failed to perform under the pressure.
I stated earlier that I see her as more of a forward, as she was dangerous in the way she was moving around. But her ruck work was a definite negative.
This season there was a strict cap on training in the pre-season. There was little chance to work on the group’s total fitness as so many players had interrupted pre=seasons. We need to get around that somehow, so our girls have a fitness edge. It is very important going forward that teams fear us in the last quarter, because we keep going and they can’t.

[10]   Disposal:
Over time our disposal was improved and the whole skillset of the AFLW has improved as well. However, we are not as skilful as some of our opponents. This was actually clearest when we played Richmond. They put a lot of pressure on the ball carrier, and we missed targets. They usually did not. We improved after that, but we do need to improve the whole skillset of the group.
Hitting targets wins games. We still don’t do it often enough.

[11]   Recruiting:
I have been quite pleased with the recruiting in recent times. Getting Maddy P was a no-brainer, but some of our recent gets have been very good. Mimi Hill looked extremely good this year before she was injured. Charlotte Wilson had a down season, but she has speed and strength and has been an excellent pick-up. Maddy Guerin and Charlotte Hammans have been trades that could be successful yet. Both showed potential, although neither has made a permanent spot as yet. Daisy Walker has also shown a bit as a later draftee. She has pace and some good decision making. Her issue is her kicking, which looks awkward and can be a little awkward. The previous year we recruited Lucy McEvoy, Grace Egan and Mua L, all who have been great successes.
So far, so good.
We took a huge risk and paid a high price for Elise O’Dea from Melbourne. Elise had a good season and was a great competitor and leader, but at 29 her body is not allowing her to get to contests like it did. She is quite slow.
A real positive is Elise’s presence on the field. She is experienced and determined. But she may not last much longer. I find it very unlikely that her body will hold together as long as Katie Loynes’ and Ali Downie’s did (although both were held together by tape more than often than not in recent times).
I do understand the risk vs. reward argument, but I think we paid too much for someone at her stage of career, even if we did get Maddy Guerin affectively for free.
I hope she proves me wrong. Assuming she plays in 2021, she will be our oldest player by some margin. We are a very young team. We will need her on-field leadership.
However, I would be loath to do a similar trade this time around.

What do we need?
We desperately need another ruck to develop, one with athleticism and height. Perhaps we can interest another code-hopper from basketball or netball, as they are likely to have the height and the leap. North have done that well in recent times.
There may well be a young ruck coming through the VFL or underage competitions. This is our biggest need, as we dropped off significantly this year when Bree Moody tired. The only time she was truly beaten was against North, against a similar type of ruck who was that bit taller and could leap that bit higher.

We do need another taller marking target in the forward line, especially if Tayla Harris’ career is going to curtailed by her knee injuries. Serena Gibbs is showing promise but doesn’t take enough marks yet. Most of her goals game from snaps. Young Paige Trudgeon is still very much an unknown quantity. From what I’ve seen of her (not enough). She doesn’t look to have the athleticism, but she can take a strong mark. And her kicking is good.

I would like it if we traded for an early pick to get Maddy P’s sister. Not only is Georgie a little taller, but she is also a strong inside midfielder who could take over from Katie Loynes.
This would take some trading, but we have proven we are decent trade partners.
Live Long and Prosper!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #6
Sorry for the essay, but I had a lot to say about this season. Hopefully, 20220 can be the one where it all comes together.
Live Long and Prosper!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #7
I thought part of the long term was for O'Dea to eventually move into coaching / mentoring, and this year she was a sort of on field player coach for our kids, but in the new environment she found her playing mojo again?

Did those plans change or have I got it wrong,............again?
The Force Awakens!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #8
It was only a season ago when Sarah Black had Elise O'Dea at #14 on the top 30 AFLW players.

Yes, she is slow. But she is hard, honest and GREAT for team morale. Her friendship with Darcy Vescio allowed them both to enjoy their footy which allowed the latte to take out the goal kicking award, again, and set a new record in the process. They look for eachother, feed off eachother and don't really play a bad game.

I rate O'Dea and even with her lack of speed, she was able to play forward, mid and even back on occasions and more importantly, influence the game in the process. I see her and i think about Teague and his inclusions this past week. All Teague wanted was players that compete and set the bar. That is O'Dea. She is also an energiser bunny, like Nat Plane, which you need around the locker room and on match days to get the energy up and get the girls going. Shy, she is not. She stands up when needed and i am more than happy with the swap of Sarah Hosking for her.....which is basically what it was (except we got Guerin with it)


Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #9
I thought part of the long term was for O'Dea to eventually move into coaching / mentoring, and this year she was a sort of on field player coach for our kids, but in the new environment she found her playing mojo again?

Did those plans change or have I got it wrong,............again?
I don't know, but with her on-field leadership I'd say she has probably started her coaching career.

I like O'Dea, she offers a lot of intangibles that are hard to quantify. But I do consider her recruitment a big risk. So far, it has paid off. If she can get through 2022 unscathed, then we might be considered winners of the trade. But her longevity as a player is probably not high.
I like the fact that she is an experienced head in such a young list: we NEED that sort of experience on the field. But it is a trick I would not like to repeat for some years to come.

I think the best time that O'Dea showed her worth was a game we had this year in the wind. She always played at the end the wind was going to, as a defender and as a forward. She got into the right spot a lot and really showed what she can do.

When we signed her, I was hoping she could move into the midfield more and take some of the pressure of Maddy P. That didn't happen. Maybe I was expecting too much, as I had not followed her career at Melbourne that closely. I just don't want us to get carried away with this sort of practice as we reach for a premiership.

We have 12 of our 30 players who are 20 years old or less, but with  couple of 21 year olds on top of that.
Live Long and Prosper!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #10
I'm suspect I'm not the only one with concerns over Tayla Harris.   Her no. 1 job at Carlton is to play as a key forward in a professional sporting competition, and her performance in that role is, too me,  what matters.   Sure players develop injuries  which hinder performance, but that is her job at Carlton.   I fear all the other peripheral stuff is distracting from kicking goals and marshalling the forward line. If she wants to do that other stuff,  fine,  but if you're wearing the navy get your priorities sorted out.
DrE is no more... you ok with that harmonica man?

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #11
I'm suspect I'm not the only one with concerns over Tayla Harris.  Her no. 1 job at Carlton is to play as a key forward in a professional sporting competition, and her performance in that role is, too me,  what matters.  Sure players develop injuries  which hinder performance, but that is her job at Carlton.  I fear all the other peripheral stuff is distracting from kicking goals and marshalling the forward line. If she wants to do that other stuff,  fine,  but if you're wearing the navy get your priorities sorted out.
So the desire to be regarded as professional without being 100% fulltime professional, is that the assertion?

Reminds me a bit of Ellyse Perry, I want to be a cricketer, I want to be a footballer, was eventually forced to choose a sport to become "Professional", of course Tayla might not choose Carlton but if that is the case we have to accept it!

Teenage boys are forced to make this choice often long before they finish school, they set a professional career path, while consigning the alternatives to hobby level.

I accept there is currently disparity between female 100% fulltime professional remuneration and the men, but no matter what the feminists want you can't get the plaudits before you get the supporters. Fans come before dollar$, you do the job ................ then you get paid, and if you do it the best ............... then you get a big bonus!

I understand the girls don't want to be pigeon-holed, they want to preserve their choices, they want to preserve their freedom, but that comes at a cost(a reduced cost!) It's an oldy but a goody, you can't have your cake and eat it too! ;)
The Force Awakens!

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #12
No,  you've missed the mark completely.   I'm judging her on her football output, which is what I believe the women want, not the other stuff.   Just like the men... put in a poor game/season and you'll get called on it,  it's nothing to do with pay rates or whatever you're spruiking.
DrE is no more... you ok with that harmonica man?

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #13
No,  you've missed the mark completely.   I'm judging her on her football output, which is what I believe the women want, not the other stuff.   Just like the men... put in a poor game/season and you'll get called on it,  it's nothing to do with pay rates or whatever you're spruiking.
I haven't made the AFLW votes public yet, but over the season, i think Harris was one of the biggest disappointments, and the votes show it.

Re: Carlton in AFLW 2021: An Analysis

Reply #14
I am thinking similarly to you, Krudd, Edwards has a lot going for her, but she isn't good enough at stopping star players, she isn't fast enough to run them down and she generally doesn't get enough of the ball. She is a great trier, but I can only see her coming in if we get a number of injuries.

Well today was the day. We picked it.
Jess Edwards has been delisted.

No other players have been delisted at this stage. We might see if anyone has more value elsewhere (via trade) than with us.