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Re: Sport, sponsors, activism and politics

Reply #135
I call total Bulldust on the value of the GP to Victoria and everyday Victorians.  No single politician or department has ever put out a realistic, rigorously determined figure that can be backed up with real data.
Im with you EB. I love F1 but the money spent by the government on it and other sports is abhorrent. $250M to the Marvel redevelopment (to a Billion dollar organisation no less) during Covid whilst people were dying, losing their houses and business. Disgusting.
2017 - 16th
2018 - Wooden Spoon
2019 - 16th
2020 - dare to dream? 11th is better than last I suppose
2021 - Pi$$ or get off the pot
2022 - Real Deal or more of the same?
2023 - "Raise the Standard" - M. Voss

Re: Sport, sponsors, activism and politics

Reply #136
I call total Bulldust on the value of the GP to Victoria and everyday Victorians.  No single politician or department has ever put out a realistic, rigorously determined figure that can be backed up with real data.

They key word there is 'realistic'.

I am very wary of anyone who puts out a 'realistic' figure. There are far too many moving parts to get a realistic figure.
As an example, i went to Austin, Texas for the first ever F1 Grand Prix they had there as part of my honeymoon. No way in hell i would've gone there for any other reason. How would Austin know this though if they did a 'realistic' breakdown?

Now, my honeymoon planning started with USA. No time of year, nothing, just America.
Looking at events we could take in decided on the time, ultimately, it was NBA, NFL and F1. We planned our trip to see who we wanted to see and where. Essentially, i flew into america 4 weeks before the F1, and flew out 2 weeks after. No chance they could attribute that to the F1.
I flew into, stayed in and hired a car from San Antonio because Austin was too expensive. (SA to Austin, similar time/distance to Geelong to Melbourne). Most of the eating i did was in San Antonio, except for what i ate during the 3 days i was at the track.

There is no way to track the effect that it had on and around Austin based on my experience, and there are plenty others like it.

It'd be the same thing for Melbourne. You can have a guess, but there is no way you'd get a realistic (read accurate) figure.

Re: Sport, sponsors, activism and politics

Reply #137
They key word there is 'realistic'.

I am very wary of anyone who puts out a 'realistic' figure. There are far too many moving parts to get a realistic figure.
As an example, i went to Austin, Texas for the first ever F1 Grand Prix they had there as part of my honeymoon. No way in hell i would've gone there for any other reason. How would Austin know this though if they did a 'realistic' breakdown?

Now, my honeymoon planning started with USA. No time of year, nothing, just America.
Looking at events we could take in decided on the time, ultimately, it was NBA, NFL and F1. We planned our trip to see who we wanted to see and where. Essentially, i flew into america 4 weeks before the F1, and flew out 2 weeks after. No chance they could attribute that to the F1.
I flew into, stayed in and hired a car from San Antonio because Austin was too expensive. (SA to Austin, similar time/distance to Geelong to Melbourne). Most of the eating i did was in San Antonio, except for what i ate during the 3 days i was at the track.

There is no way to track the effect that it had on and around Austin based on my experience, and there are plenty others like it.

It'd be the same thing for Melbourne. You can have a guess, but there is no way you'd get a realistic (read accurate) figure.


Its part of a broader spectrum.

The Australian Open.
The Grand Prix.

ICONIC events to the world.  I hate the F1 and couldnt give a rats about it, but since Adelaide lost it, no one knows anything about the place or where it is.

Sydney drive an F1 car onto the Harbour Bridge for a reason.  Iconic and it would cost a boatload to stage that crap.

When you go round the world, the AFL is something that gives us a bit of attention, because people know we are crazy Aussies that play contact sports without protection.

I havent been interested in F1 since Michael Schumacher was racing and cigarettes were still sponsoring cars, but I know enough to understand the international pulling power of it.  Even the MotoGp down in Phillip Island is renowned in the racing circles.  My evidence is mainly anecdotal.  Melbourne's reputation as sporting capital of Australia is attributed largely to winning the Grand Prix hosting off Adelaide, having the MCG, and hosting the Australian Open.

Lucky for us we have that stuff, because the climate in the other cities is infinitely better most of the year round, as is the wine!
"everything you know is wrong"

Paul Hewson

Re: Sport, sponsors, activism and politics

Reply #138
They key word there is 'realistic'.

I am very wary of anyone who puts out a 'realistic' figure. There are far too many moving parts to get a realistic figure.
As an example, i went to Austin, Texas for the first ever F1 Grand Prix they had there as part of my honeymoon. No way in hell i would've gone there for any other reason. How would Austin know this though if they did a 'realistic' breakdown?

Now, my honeymoon planning started with USA. No time of year, nothing, just America.
Looking at events we could take in decided on the time, ultimately, it was NBA, NFL and F1. We planned our trip to see who we wanted to see and where. Essentially, i flew into america 4 weeks before the F1, and flew out 2 weeks after. No chance they could attribute that to the F1.
I flew into, stayed in and hired a car from San Antonio because Austin was too expensive. (SA to Austin, similar time/distance to Geelong to Melbourne). Most of the eating i did was in San Antonio, except for what i ate during the 3 days i was at the track.

There is no way to track the effect that it had on and around Austin based on my experience, and there are plenty others like it.

It'd be the same thing for Melbourne. You can have a guess, but there is no way you'd get a realistic (read accurate) figure.


Well said, K.

If you're looking for an exact/quantifiable $ amount on your investment of sponsorship, it will be just about impossible to come up with a figure. Ball park, big ball park, figure... maybe. Sponsorship is an art as much as a science. It's also an on-going commitment to the event.

Sponsorship is a big picture investment. There are so many intangibles yet also huge benefits when placed correctly and done well. Share of mind and branding, I think the ad agencies gurus call it and then how the investor in sponsorship uses their sponsorship. With Melbourne branding itself as a sporting capital and proving it with staging international events it will be perceived as 'big' and an action place... a place for global travellers to put on their agenda of places to visit. Puts us on the map, and if not us, it would be someone else getting the global media attention.

I think it was NB (NorthernBlue) who mentioned, and very accurately so, all the flow on benefits of sponsorship. All the flow-on jobs created. My bro (an industrial electrician) is often in charge of the huge gennies needed at these major events, an enormous job which creates plenty of employment opportunities. Just one example.

The local plumber in a country town who has his signage on the wing of the footy oval, will get some business from the signage but in a variety of ways, directly through his/her mobile no. on the sign, confidence gained from those who've used him/her before to recommend and keep him/her top of mind for next time... then there are the events the plumbers attends with the club, the signwriter who created the sign and so on.
Only our ruthless best, from Board to bootstudders will get us no. 17